Posts Tagged ‘Biodynamic’

Pure Ingredients Thanks to Biodynamic Farming

Monday, March 1st, 2010

Pomega5 uses only the finest ingredients in our products, derived from biodynamic plants and botanicals from France and the Mediterranean. Do you ever wonder what boidynamic means? Well, you’re not the only one – it can be pretty confusing. Here’s our take on it:

Biodynamic Agriculture and its History

In contrast to conventional practices, the biodynamic method of farming views the farm as a living organism and emphasizes the interrelationship of the soil, animals, and plants in a closed, self-nourishing system – providing nutritionally dense and medicinal crop.

Interest in biodynamic farming began 1924, when a group of European farmers began noticing rapid decline in seed fertility, crop, and animal health. With the help of Dr. Rudolf Steiner (20th century philosopher, architect, and social thinker) the biodynamic agricultural philosophy was born.

Sickness Equals Imbalance

Biodynamic goes beyond organic farming in that it does not allow any sort of pesticides, herbicides, or fungicides to be sprayed on the farm. But it also sees sickness as a sign of imbalance – a loss of connection with the system that provides life and health. The more the farm is treated with chemicals, the more it becomes an environment for side effects or new diseases. Nature creates viruses whose duty it is to destroy plants that are lacking life forces and recycle them back into the system.

Healthy Soil is Vital

Traditional farming depletes soil of the vital nutrients that support healthy plant-life. The biodynamic method focuses on the maintenance of soil life to protect it from erosion and preserve it for generations. The application of organic manure and compost, proper crop rotations, cover crop, and crop diversification all aid in feeding the soil with the proper nutrients and bacteria to promote balance.

There are specific biodynamic compost preparations made of medicinal herbs that have undergone long processes of fermentation in order to enrich them in growth-stimulating substances, reacting like yeast in dough within the soil.

Biodynamic farming also follows a planting calendar that takes astronomical influences into consideration (including moon phases and seasonality) that is most appropriate for planting, cultivating, and harvest various types of crops.

To find out more information about biodynamic agriculture, check these out!

Biodynamic Farming and Gardening Association

The Josephine Porter Institute for Applied Biodynamics

Benziger Winery

Ceago Vinegarden

Marian Farms

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